WORLD GETTING WARMER. 22 May 1950. Sydney was becoming a hotter place to live in. People who had lived on the North Shore line for the past 25 years have plenty of material evidence of the change in temperature. Temperatures everywhere are changing. Rain and snow falls are altering.

WORLD GETTING WARMER (1950, May 22). Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 – 1954), p. 2. Retrieved August 2, 2021, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/63468575?searchTerm=worlds%20temperature%20getting%20warmer&searchLimits=#

SYDNEY, May 21— Weather throughout the world was taking a turn for the better, stated the Director of the Museum of Technology and Applied Science, Mr. A. R, Penfold, to-day.
He said  this had been going on for 100 years, but the change has been most marked in the last two decades.
Sydney was becoming a hotter place to live in. People who had lived on the North Shore line for the past 25 years have plenty of material evidence of the change in temperature. Plants that used to flourish in properties facing the north, do not so so well there any more.
‘You have to plant on the southern side because the north is too hot,’ Mr. Penfold said.
Temperatures everywhere are changing. Rain and snow falls are altering, trees have bigger growths on them, low and high pressure areas are moving, and there an marked changes in the natural distribution of many birds, animals and trees.
Mr. Penfold said, ‘Dr. Julian Huxley’s recent trip to Iceland revealed an enormous shrinking of the polar pack ice due to the increased heat of the sun. The Arctic Ocean has risen about an inch in 80 years due to the sun melting the ice packs.
The snow fall in Montreal, Canada, has dropped from 130 inches a year In 1880, to 80 Inches to-day.’
The best sign of the change In the lower latitudes was that the East African lakes were drying.
The Icelanders between 900 A D. and 1800 A.D. grew a lot of barley, but after that the increase in the ice flow made barley growing impossible. To-day all the barley growing districts in that country are exposed, and the barley grower is coming back into his own again.