WORLD HEATING UP GREAT ICECAPS DISSOLVING AT POLES. 26 Aug 1933. The ice has left the British Isles, most of Scandinavia, and most of Iceland, “But it lingers round Greenland and still covers the Poles. In time, it may all melt, and there will be no ice even at the Poles.

WORLD HEATING Up (1933, August 26). The Evening News (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1924 – 1941), p. 8. Retrieved May 30, 2022, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/200602119?searchTerm=world%20heating%20up&searchLimits=#

Raise Sea Level.
THE world is gradually becoming both warmer and drier.
One day, the great Polar icecaps may melt, raising the level of the oceans from 40 to 50ft., and wiping half of England from the map.
These suggestions were made by Sir Douglas Mawson, the famous Polar explorer, and Dr. C. fi. P. Brooks, of the British : Meteorological Office, who is a leading authority on the effect of
Polar conditions on climate.
“This warming-up processes slow,” said Sir Douglas.
“In fact, all we may expect is a rise in average temperature of 2 or 3 degrees Fahrenheit each 1000 years!
“We are approaching the end of the Pleistocene ice-age. The ice has left the British Isles, most of Scandinavia, and most of Iceland, “But it lingers round Greenland and still covers the Poles. In time, it may all melt, and there will be no ice even at the Poles.
Such periods have probably occurred several times in the earth’s history”
Dr. Brooks – declared : — “The present masses of ice at the Poles have an area of about 3½ million square miles and their average thickness approaches 2000ft.
“If all this ice melts, the level of the oceans will rise from 40ft. to 50ft.
“The smaller the amount of ice the drier the world’s climate, will tend to become, as ice is one of the chief causes of the storms that bring us rain.”
If the sea were to rise 50ft. many large and important parts of England would cease to exist.
All central London and most of the suburbs along the Thames Valley would be under water. ” Essex and Suffolk would have a new coastline, running, as a rule, several – miles “in land” from the present one, and the Norfolk Broads would become part of the North Sea.
In place of the Wash there would be a huge inlet covering the Fen country and Cambridge, Lincoln and Doncaster would become seaside resorts.
Not much would be left of the East Riding of Yorkshire, and Lancashire, too would become a mere shadow of its former self.
Holyhead would rise in solitary glory from what had been Holy Island and the sea would as relentlessly flow over most of Anglesey.
Cardiff and Loughnor would be badly embarrassed by a new and broader Bristol Channel, the Severn Estuary would run up to Worcester, and a new estuary would cut somerset in half.
Of England’s southern counties, only Cornwall and Devon would escape, for Dorset around Poole, Hampshire near and including Southampton and Portsmouth, and Sussex in its western corner, would all be submerged while the Isle of Thanet would once again be cut off from Kent.