Heat Apoplexy Mon 20 Jan 1908

HEAT APOPLEXY. (1908, January 20). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 – 1957), p. 5. Retrieved July 2, 2022, from https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/10675848/351244#

HEAT APOPLEXY.
TEN DEATHS IN MELBOURNE.
No fewer than ten deaths, due to sunstroke and heat apoplexy, have been reported to the coroner during the last two days. In many cases the deaths have been those of people who lived in close, stuffy rooms, often immediately under an iron roof, and who have remained indoors, in the mistaken idea that shade of any sort was preferable to the open air. Several deaths, however, occurred in the open air, workmen having been stricken down in the midst of their work.
Eliza Lennears, a married woman, residing at 120 Gore-street, Fitzroy, was found unconscious at her residence at half-past 9 on Saturday night. She was taken to the Melbourne Hospital, but was dead before the Hospital was reached. A post-mortem examination by Dr. Shields showed that death had been due to heart failure, accelerated by undue heat.
Thomas Costlett, a resident of Newport, who was employed as a tip-cleaner by the Williamstown Town Council, was found lying dead in Burleigh-road, Spotswood, on Saturday. The body was removed to the Williamstown Morgue, where Dr. McLean made a post-mortem examination, and found that death had been caused by congestion of the lungs and heart failure, due to heat apoplexy.
John Aitken Reaburn was harnessing a horse in his backyard on Saturday night, with the intention of taking his wife and children for a drive. He had hardly got the animal in the shafts when he was seized with heat apoplexy, and fell dead. Dr. MacKeddie found that death had been caused by a fatty heart, pulmonary engorgement, and kidney disease accelerated by heat. The deceased resided at 38 Brunswick road west, Brunswick.
Joseph Dean Freeman, a cab-driver, 68 years of age, who lived at Auburn, fell dead in Prospect Hill road, Camberwell, on Saturday. Dr. Mollison made a post-mortem examination, and found that death had been caused by pulmonary engorgement and heart failure due to heat.
Arthur Dawson, a driver, 45 years of age, employed at McCracken’s Brewery, and living in Westgarth-street, Fitzroy, fell on the pavement just as he was about to enter the Rising Sun Hotel, Bay-street, Port Melbourne, on Saturday afternoon. Constable Sullivan removed him to the Hospital, where he died a few minutes after admission. A post-mortem examination showed that death had been caused by heart failure and congestion of the lungs, due to heat.
Samuel Douttch, a painter, 43 years of age, who lived with his wife and family at 623 Drummond-street, North Carlton, came home from work at 1 o’clock on Saturday afternoon, and was then in normal health.
He went out after lunch to get a shave, and returned to his home in a couple of hours in a dazed and helpless condition. At 8 o’clock in the evening he died. Dr. Brett made a post-mortem examination and found that death was due to heart failure and pulmonary engorgement, due to heat apoplexy.
James Reilly, 34 years of age, living with his wife and family at 26 Raphael-street, Collingwood, was found lying in Victoria street on Saturday afternoon. Constable Hennessy removed him to the Melbourne Hospital, where he died at 8 o’clock on Saturday evening. Dr Mollison found, by post-morte examination, that death had been caused by heat apoplexy.
Owen Murtagh, a man about 40 years of age, who lived at the Criterion Hotel, Clarendon-street, South Melbourne, was found dead on a couch in an old stable at the rear of the hotel on Sunday.
The body was removed to the Morgue, where Dr. Mollison made a post-mortem examination, and found that death had been caused by congestion of the lungs and syncope, due to heat exhaustion.
Winifred Power, 67 years of age died, at the Lord Raglan Hotel, Raglan-street, Port Melbourne, yesterday afternoon. She had been suffering from bronchitis for 15 years. A post-mortem examination disclosed that death had been accelerated by the heat.
A lad, named Murphy, was stricken with heat apoplexy at Goldberg’s restaurant, 175 Russell-street, yesterday evening. He was taken to the Melbourne Hospital, but was dead on admission.
A widow, between 60 and 70 years of age, named Margaret Mary Josephine Davey, lodging at 80 Young-street, Fitzroy, died suddenly early on Sunday morning. Dr. A. Hodgson, who had been attending her for some time, stated that Mrs. Davey suffered from a weak heart, and there was not the slightest doubt that her death had been accelerated by the great heat of the past few days.